Found 582 Documents across 59 Pages (0.009 seconds)
  1. Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples of Murdock's DataRudmin, Floyd Webster - Journal of Socio-Economics, 1995 - 2 Hypotheses

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  2. Ascertaining, testing, and interpreting sequences of cultural developmentCarneiro, Robert L. - Southwestern Journal of Anthropology, 1968 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study takes an evolutionary approach to understanding cultural development. The author suggests that "the degree of regularity in the relative order of development of any two traits is directly proportional to the evolutionary distance between them." Scale analysis supports this proposition.

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  3. Rise and fall of political complexity in island South-East Asia and the PacificCurrie, Thomas E. - Nature, 2010 - 6 Hypotheses

    Using phylogenetic modeling, the researchers test hypotheses for different sequences of political complexity among South-East Asian and Pacific Austronesian-speaking cultures. The research adds to an existing debate between sequential, incremental political evolution models and non-sequential models with larger increases in complexity. The results suggest support for a more sequential unilinear model.

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  4. Universal patterns in cultural evolution: an empirical analysis using Guttman scalingPeregrine, Peter N. - American Anthropologist, 2004 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests for universal patterns in cultural evolution by Guttman scaling on two different worldwide samples of archaeological traditions and on well-known archaeological sequences. The evidence is generally consistent with universal evolutionary sequences.

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  5. Agricultural intensification and craft specialization: a nonrecursive modelDow, Malcolm M. - Ethnology, 1985 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study uses four widely discussed hypotheses regarding the relationship between agricultural intensification and craft specialization to develop a non-recursive model. Authors test the model on both worldwide and regional subsamples. Results show support for a hypothesis proposing a feedback relationship between increasingly productive agricultural systems and the division of labor into nonagricultural craft specialties.

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  6. Art styles as cultural cognitive mapsFischer, J. L. - American Anthropologist, 1961 - 7 Hypotheses

    This paper tests theory suggesting that art is a form of expressive cultures which ultimately is shaped by the social conditions under which people in a society live. Focuses on social hierarchy and its relationship to art styles.

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  7. Indices of sociocultural development and cultural accumulation: an exponential cultural growth law and a "cultural surgency" factorBowden, Edgar - American Anthropologist, 1969 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article investigates a broad hypothesis that cultural traits diversify with sociocultural development. Results suggest that sociocultual development is associated with certain aspects of aesthetic and ritual culture, and that cultural elaboration may be correlated with some sexual norms and tendency toward cannibalism, human sacrifice, and slavery.

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  8. A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-GatherersTextor, Robert B. - , 1967 - 9 Hypotheses

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  9. The economics of misbehavior, love and marriage contract enforcementHull, Brooks - Economics Working Papers, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study examines the predictors of arranged marriage versus marriage for love. Several predictions are supported and results uphold the hypothesis that "societies promote the method of marriage contract enforcement best adapted to available production technology, incentives to misbehave, and methods of coercion."

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  10. Witchcraft beliefs and the erosion of social capital: Evidence from Sub-Saharan Africa and BeyondGershman, Boris - Journal of Development Economics, 2016 - 11 Hypotheses

    In this article, the author seeks to understand the effect of witchcraft beliefs (both personal and regional) on various measures of social capital. Through empirical tests, the author concludes that witchcraft beliefs are robustly associated with anti-social attitudes in 19 Sub-Saharan African countries. Specifically, they find that witchcraft and other supernatural beliefs significantly affect levels of both generalized trust and trust for people of other religions. They also find that these attitudes are present among second-generation immigrants to Europe who originate from these countries. The worldwide Standard Cross-Cultural Sample is also used to examine relationships between witchcraft, mistrust, and other anti-social behaviors.

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