Found 860 Documents across 86 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Rethinking the couvade: cross-cultural evidenceBroude, Gwen J. - American Anthropologist, 1988 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article examines several possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that father presence, rather than the expected father absence, is significantly associated with the couvade.

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  2. The couvade: a psychological analysisMunroe, Robert L. - Ethos, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study examines possible correlates of the couvade. Results suggest that matri-residence, mother-infant sleeping arrangements, and low male salience all are associated with the couvade.

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  3. Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?Broude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  4. The absent father and cross-sex identityBurton, Roger V. - Studies in Adolescence, 1963 - 2 Hypotheses

    This study advances the status envy hypothesis of sex identification to explain customs such as male initiation ceremonies and the couvade. Theory of sex identification is discussed; resource withholding, exclusive mother-child sleeping, patrilocality, father absence, female status, and initiation are all considered. Hypotheses are supported with empirical tests.

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  5. Male sex role resolutionsMunroe, Robert L. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 3 Hypotheses

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  6. Protest masculinity: a further look at the causes and the conceptBroude, Gwen J. - Ethos, 1990 - 4 Hypotheses

    A study of the factors that predict extremely masculine behaviors and traits in men (conceptualized as protest masculinity in the status-envy and father-absence theories). Findings point to the important role of socialization for aggression as a mediating factor in the relationship between father's role and "protest masculinity."

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  7. A cross-cultural study of female initiation ritesBrown, Judith K. - American Anthropologist, 1963 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article discusses initiation rites for girls. Specifically explored are the reasons why the ceremonies are observed in some societies and omitted in others and what the variations between societies demonstrates.

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  8. Explaining male initiation ceremonies: new cross-cultural tests and a catalytic modelEmber, Carol R. - Cross-Cultural Research, 2010 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article discusses two different explanations of male initiation ceremonies. Evidence is also presented that suggests that psychological conflict might strongly predict male initiation in the presence of the following catalysts: nonmatrilocal residence, nonstate political organization, and warfare.

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  9. The function of male initiation ceremonies: a cross-cultural test of an alternative hypothesisYoung, Frank W. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study investigates theories of male initiation ceremonies. The author examines a hypothesis related to child-rearing variables (sleeping arrangements and post-partum taboo) and rejects it based on empirical analysis. An alternative hypothesis related to male solidarity is offered.

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  10. The politics of reproductive ritualPaige, Jeffery M. - , 1981 - 20 Hypotheses

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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