Found 841 Documents across 85 Pages (0.01 seconds)
  1. General evolution and Durkheim's hypothesis of crime frequency: A cross-cultural testLeavitt, Gregory C. - The Sociological Quarterly, 1992 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper is an investigation into the relationship between social differentiation as a proxy for societal 'development' and various categories of crime. A positive relationship is interpreted by the author as empirical cross-cultural support for Durkheim's theory that these two factors will increase together as parallel processes of 'sociocultural evolution'.

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  2. Warless societies and the origin of warKelly, Raymond C. - , 2000 - 8 Hypotheses

    This book examines the difference between warless and warlike societies and attempts to determine the point at which a society becomes warlike. The author suggests that differences between warless and warlike societies are mostly organizational and hypothesizes that "unsegmented" societies, or societies that have a weaker sense of group identity and cohesion, will be more likely to be warless than "segmented" societies. Several tests are presented. Results generally support the hypothesis.

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  3. Social structure and conflict: Evidence from sub-Saharan AfricaMoscona, Jacob - Working paper, 2017 - 3 Hypotheses

    Using a sample of 145 African societies, the authors seek to examine the relationship between segmentary lineage organization and conflict. Presented is evidence supporting the claim that segmentary lineage societies are more prone to conflict and to conflicts larger in scale and duration. The authors aim to contribute to a better understanding of the determinants of conflict, and additionally address the applicability of the present study beyond Africa.

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  4. Disappearance of the incest taboo: a cross-cultural test of general evolutionary hypothesesLeavitt, Gregory C. - American Anthropologist, 1989 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article presents a theory of evolutionary development of incest regulation, namely that as societal complexity increases the incest taboo will become less extensive. The author presents empirical support for this theory, though the association is not supported among simply structured societies. The role of descent type is also discussed.

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  5. An eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth: a cross-cultural study of feudingOtterbein, Keith F. - American Anthropologist, 1965 - 6 Hypotheses

    This study investigates the presence of feuding, arguing that a solely evolutionary or functional approach misses important inter-societal factors. Results indicate that while fraternal interest groups are associated with feuding, the presence of war and level of political integration also increase the likelihood of feuding.

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  6. The causes of matrilocal residence: a cross-ethnohistorical surveyDivale, William Tulio - , 1974 - 20 Hypotheses

    Author proposes and presents evidence in support of the theory that most societies practice virilocal or patrilocal residence (this is the "normal" pattern" and that matrilocal residence is adopted when societies migrate to an already populated area.

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  7. On the emergence of large-scale human social integration and its antecedents in primatesGrueter, Cyril C. - Structure and Dynamics: eJournal of Anthropological and Related Sciences, 2014 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates whether external warfare, intercommunity trade, and female exogamy lead to more amicable intercommunity relationships. Intercommunity amicability is considered a historical facilitator of the large-scale integration of human groups. The absence of internal warfare is used as a measure for intercommunity amicability.

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  8. Warless and warlike hunter-gatherers: a comparisonKelly, Robert L. - Warless Societies and the Origin of War, 2000 - 7 Hypotheses

    This book examines the characteristics of warlike and warless foraging societies, as well as the transitional stages that occur when a society becomes warlike. Several predicted correlates of warfare frequency are supported.

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  9. Trade and warfare in cross-cultural perspectiveKorotayev, Andrey V. - Social Evolution & History, 2008 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines the relationship between warfare and trade and concludes that the relationship varies within different levels of political organization.

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  10. War, peace, and marital residence in pre-industrial societiesDivale, William Tulio - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1976 - 8 Hypotheses

    This article tests a series of hypotheses differentiating internal warfare and external warfare. Results support the theory that internal warfare is a population control mechanism more common in patrilocal societies, whereas external warfare occurs between two societies, one of which recently migrated and adopted matrilocal residence. Based on these findings, the authors assert that internal warfare can be regulated while external warfare cannot.

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