Found 882 Documents across 89 Pages (0.014 seconds)
  1. The politics of birth practices: a strategic analysisPaige, Karen - American Sociological Review, 1973 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article examines cross-cultural variation in customary birth practices for men and women, testing a general hypothesis that birth practices represent tactics in negotiations over paternity. Data supports this hypothesis, and a series of related variables are tested in bivariate analysis and path analysis. Findings suggest that compensation demands at birth are associated with maternal restrictions from paternity-related agreements (e.g. maternal seclusion during birth), and fraternal interest groups are associated with the husband’s ritual involvement at birth (e.g. demonstration of the couvade).

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  2. Male sex role resolutionsMunroe, Robert L. - Handbook of Cross-Cultural Human Development, 1981 - 3 Hypotheses

    This chapter discusses the predictors of the couvade and male circumcision ceremonies cross-culturally. New findings suggest relationships between these two variables and infant carrying practices, marital residence, and descent.

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  3. Conditions that may favor avunculocal residenceEmber, Melvin - Behavior Science Research, 1974 - 2 Hypotheses

    This paper suggests that previously matrilocal and matrilineal societies which are subject to a high mortality rate when they switch to fighting internally will develop avunculocal residence. The cross-cultural data presented supports the hypothesis.

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  4. Factors in the division of labor by sex: a cross-cultural analysisMurdock, George Peter - Ethnology, 1973 - 9 Hypotheses

    This article investigates factors influencing the division of labor by gender, including occupation specialization, the type of material labor involves, the presence of the plow, nomadism, and the advantage that a product may yield to either sex. Hypotheses are widely supported.

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  5. Female of the speciesMartin, M. Kay - , 1975 - 12 Hypotheses

    This book discusses the role of women cross-culturally. The authors use a cross-cultural sample to examine the differences between men and women in contribution to subsistence as well as the social juxtaposition of the sexes in foraging, horticultural, agricultural, pastoral, and industrial societies.

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  6. An apologia of george peter murdock. Division of labor by gender and postmarital residence in cross-cultural prespective: a reconsiderationKorotayev, Andrey V. - World Cultures, 2001 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article tests hypotheses put forth by Murdock that female contribution to subsistence is associated with matrilocal residence.

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  7. Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a new analysisRoss, Marc Howard - Journal of Conflict Resolution, 1985 - 4 Hypotheses

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  8. Revisiting status-envy: does the theory hold up?Broude, Gwen J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1989 - 7 Hypotheses

    Author first tests the validity of the variables traditionallyused in tests of status envy theory. Then the author tests some of the implications of the theory and proposes somewhat different mechanisms.

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  9. Circumscription Theory of the Origins of the State: A Cross-Cultural Re-analysisZinkina, Julia - Cliodynamics, 2016 - 3 Hypotheses

    In this article, the authors reevaluate Carneiro's (1970) circumscription theory of state formation. They do this by examining relationships between the degree of political hierarchy and whether warfare is conducted for conquest, land acquisition, or plunder. While they find evidence that this theory is plausible in some situations, there is not enough to support the theory wholesale. Thus, they suggest that other theories of state formation should be investigated.

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  10. Toward an ecological-evolutionary theory of the incidence of warfare in preindustrial societiesNolan, Patrick D. - Sociological Theory, 2003 - 2 Hypotheses

    This article reassesses the question of relative peacefulness/violence of preindustrial societies. It tests two materialist theories suggesting that more advanced subsistence techniques and population pressure will increase the likelihood of warfare.

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