Found 125 Documents across 13 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Rice farming, culture and democracyAng, James B. - European Economic Review, 2021 - 4 Hypotheses

    The authors propose that societies with a tradition of rice farming are less likely to develop a democracy than societies with a tradition of wheat farming. They base their predictions on the theory that wheat farming, as opposed to rice farming, does not require extensive community collaboration and promotes individualism, which then in turn promotes democracy. Their findings were robustly consistent with their predictions. The authors used multiple controls in their analyses, including religion, economic development, geography, and local democratic practices.

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  2. Societal complexity or production techniques: another look at udy's data on the structure of work organizationsNorr, James L. - American Journal of Sociology, 1977 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study asserts that the structure of work organizations is affected more by production techniques than societal complexity. Empirical analysis suggests two trends: 1) production techniques that increase the importance of workers will influence rationality in work organizations, and 2) production techniques that increase the importance of workers and societal complexity will affect the bureaucratic elements of work organizations approximately equally. These findings challenge Udy’s (1970) thesis that complex peasant societies face more challenges than less complex societies in transitioning to modern industrial work forms.

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  3. A cross-cultural study of reincarnation ideologies and their social correlatesMatlock, James Graham - , 1993 - 33 Hypotheses

    This dissertation discusses the divided theoretical approach to how reincarnation, animism, spirits, and general religious beliefs occur within societies cross-culturally. Matlock offers evidence to support Tyler, contradicting the generally accepted Durkheimian approach, arguing that the belief about souls and spirits may originate in dreams and other empirical experiences, in turn informing and shaping social organization. Durkheim argued the opposite, claiming that religious beliefs reflect social organization such as the clan and kinship. The author states 33 quantitative hypotheses to be tested using 30 of the first 60 sample societies available in the HRAF Probability Sample.

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  4. On a method of investigating the development of institutions: applied to laws of marriage and descentTylor, Edward B. - Readings in Cross-Cultural Methodology, 1961 - 5 Hypotheses

    This paper, the first cross-cultural study published in 1889 (reprinted here) asserts that tabulation and classification are important methodological tools to study anthropological subjects. The author investigates the development of institutions of marriage and descent, tabulating data on residence, descent, kinship terminology, wife capture, and exogamy.

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  5. Ecology, trade, and states in pre-colonial AfricaFenske, James - Journal of the European Economic Association, 2014 - 3 Hypotheses

    The author analyzes 440 Sub-Saharan African societies to test whether trade across ecologically diverse zones is predictive of degree of state centralization (state capacity or strength of state) in pre-colonial Africa. The author finds that diverse ecology is predictive of state capacity and that trade supports class stratification. The author also emphasizes the importance of historical contingency and ethnographic data consultation in understanding mechanisms in individual cases.

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  6. Private lands and common oceans: analysis of the development of property regimesAcheson, James M. - Current Anthropology, 2015 - 1 Hypotheses

    In this article, the author departs from previous research on common vs. private property ownership predictors to understand why ocean property rights often play out differently than land. As opposed to the dominant hypothesis that common property regimes will change to private property when resources are scarce and population increases, the author proposes economic defendability (the relationship between the value of the property and the cost to defend it) as a better predictor of property regime type.

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  7. Patterns of paternal investment predict cross-cultural variation in jealous responseScelza, B. A. - Nature Human Behavior, 2019 - 6 Hypotheses

    In an effort to better understand variation in jealous response cross-culturally, the researchers of this study surveyed 11 different populations, eight of which were small-scale societies on five different continents (Mayangna, Shuar, Tsimane, Himba, Hadza, Karo Batak, Mosuo, and Yasawa) and three of which were in urban settings (Los Angeles, CA, "urban India" (online), and Okinawa, Japan). Looking at the differences between sexual and emotional infidelity, researchers found that greater paternal investment and lower frequency of extramarital sex are associated with more severe jealous response.

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  8. A comparison of three measures of social complexitySchaefer, James Michael - American Anthropologist, 1969 - 1 Hypotheses

    The author compares three scales of social complexity (Naroll's Social Development Index, Freeman's Scale, and Marsh's Index of Differentiation) and determine whether they tend to measure the same developmental variable. The author's statistical comparisons illustrate that each scale applies the same standard in ranking societies

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  9. Food taboos and level of culture: a cross-cultural studyLeary, James R. - Final Report, USPHS Grant No. A-3557, 1967 - 1 Hypotheses

    This study looks at the relationship between cultural complexity and food taboos. Results indicate that less complex societies tend to have more restrictions on eating than more complex societies.

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  10. A hologeistic study of family structure and sentiment, supernatural beliefs, and drunkennessSchaefer, James Michael - , 1972 - 12 Hypotheses

    This study tests a broad hypothesis that alcohol is employed to relieve anxiety and feelings of powerlessness. Frequency of drunkenness and drunken brawling were associated with several variables, including supernatural beliefs, political systems, settlement patterns, and division of labor.

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