Found 83 Documents across 9 Pages (0.002 seconds)
  1. Divorce and the status of womenPearson, Jr., Willie - Journal of Marriage and the Family, 1979 - 3 Hypotheses

    This paper reports on a cross-cultural test of the theory that higher status of women causes higher divorce rates. This theory has typically been expressed in terms of variations in family authority or in terms of women's economic opportunities (375).

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  2. Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustrial peoplesUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - , 1959 - 36 Hypotheses

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  3. Factor analysis of a cross-cultural sampleMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1973 - 3 Hypotheses

    This study employs factor analysis to develop a settlement pattern scale of cultural complexity. Political, economic, and religious factors are identified and implications for the structure of the cultural system are discussed.

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  4. Food resource periodicity and cooperation values: a cross-cultural considerationPoggie, Jr., John J. - Cross-Cultural Research, 1995 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article examines socialization for cooperation as a function of economic production. The author theorizes that in societies where large amounts of food production labor must be accomplished quickly, there is a higher cultural value placed on cooperation.

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  5. The relation between social stratification and social controlMoore, B., Jr. - Sociometry, 1942 - 3 Hypotheses

    This article explores the relationship between social stratification and control hierarchies, defined as "command-obedience relationships" within economic, political, religious, military, and familial institutions. Results indicate a positive association.

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  6. Administrative rationality, social setting, and organizational developmentUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Journal of Sociology, 1962 - 4 Hypotheses

    This study examines organizational characteristics associated with administrative rationality, as well as how organizational development differs under varying social or cultural conditions.

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  7. Military organization as a response to residence and size of population: a cross-cultural studyCarter, Jr., Harold - Behavior Science Research, 1977 - 7 Hypotheses

    This study tests an adaptational theory of military organization. Test of the relationship between population, residence type and military organization are presented; findings support the hypotheses.

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  8. 'Bureaucracy' and 'rationality' in Weber's organization theoryUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - American Sociological Review, 1959 - 3 Hypotheses

    "Seven of Max Weber's ideal-typical specifications for 'rational bureaucracy' are reformulated as a system of three 'bureaucratic' and four 'rational' variables. It is proposed that (a) bureaucratic variables are positively associated; (b) rational variables are positively associated; but that (c) rational variables are negatively associated with bureaucratic variables." Hypotheses are supported.

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  9. A cross-cultural method for predicting nonmaterial traits in archeologyMcNett, Charles W., Jr. - Behavior Science Notes, 1970 - 2 Hypotheses

    "This paper presents an exploratory attempt to solve the problem of how to infer traits for which no direct material evidence remains." The author suggests that the archeologically defined community pattern can predict several sociocultural traits. Results support this hypothesis.

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  10. Investigation into deindividuation using a cross-cultural survey techniqueWatson, Robert I., Jr. - Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 1973 - 1 Hypotheses

    This article investigates the relationship between aggression in warfare and deindividuation (or the loss of self-awareness in groups). Results suggest a significant positive relationship between these two variables.

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