Found 3788 Hypotheses across 379 Pages (0.005 seconds)
  1. Parent-infant body contact after birth is emphasized in most societies (595).Lozoff, Betsy - Birth and 'bonding' in non-industrial societies, 1983 - 1 Variables

    This study examines the presence of parent-infant body contact at birth in non-industrial societies and its effects on subsequent infant care. The results show that immediate parent-infant contact is not common among most societies and does not have a significant effect on the quality of infant care.

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  2. Infant care will be different among societies which foster parent-infant body contact and those that do not (595).Lozoff, Betsy - Birth and 'bonding' in non-industrial societies, 1983 - 4 Variables

    This study examines the presence of parent-infant body contact at birth in non-industrial societies and its effects on subsequent infant care. The results show that immediate parent-infant contact is not common among most societies and does not have a significant effect on the quality of infant care.

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  3. Variation in paternal care within a species will be correlated with variation in socioecological conditions (157).Katz, Mary Maxwell - The role of the father: an anthropological perspective, 1981 - 4 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between male parental behavior and influences of species, ecological and social factors. The authors first present a cross-phylogenetic perspective on paternal differences between species, then offer two quantitative studies: a comparative study of non-western human societies that correlates father-infant proximity with socioecological factors and another about father-infant proximity among the !Kung.

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  4. The infant/child's age at the cessation of breastfeeding is lower in preindustrial populations with agricultural or pastoral subsistence type than in hunting and gathering socieities (p. 50).Sellen, Daniel W. - Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" soci..., 2001 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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  5. The infant/child's age at introduction of liquid and solid non-breastmilk foods tends to be lower in preindustrial populations with agricultural or pastoral subsistence types than in hunting and gathering socieities (p. 50).Sellen, Daniel W. - Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" soci..., 2001 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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  6. Agricultural societies will have higher paternal certainty than hunter-gatherer societies (230).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  7. The type of food given to children during weaning was qualitatively different across subsistence types (p. 50).Sellen, Daniel W. - Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" soci..., 2001 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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  8. Men in agricultural societies will be more likely to invest in their offspring (via inheritance) than men in hunter-gatherer societies (239).Gaulin, Steven J.C. - Sexual dimorphism in the human post-reproductive life-span: possible causes, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This study tests possible explanations for sexual dimorphism in human post-reproductive life-spans. The author focuses on explanations involving male paternal investment and finds that men in agricultural societies are more likely to invest in their offspring than men in hunter-gatherer societies.

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  9. Productivity (a measure of subsistence type), is positively associated with the presence of High Gods (p. 2t5).Peoples, Hervey C. - Subsistence and the evolution of religion, 2012 - 2 Variables

    This study exmaines the presence of High Gods in societies as a function of subsistence type, population size, and stratification. High Gods are thought to be a mechanism to encourage collective action in the face of environmental challenges. Animal husbandry was found to be a strong predictor of High Gods, especially gods that are active in human affairs or morally supportive.

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  10. Agriculturalist populations will have lower infant and child mortality rates than hunter-gatherer populations.Volk, Anthony A. - Infant and child death in the human environment of evolutionary adaptation, 2013 - 3 Variables

    High infant and child mortality rates are suggested to be one of the most enduring and important features of ancestral human environments, referred to as the Environment of Evolutionary Adaptedness (EEA). These rates contrast with the very low rates of infant and child mortality among many industrialized nations since the 19th and 20th centuries. The authors compare data from recent hunter-gatherer and agricultural societies, historical records, and non-human primates in attempt to quantitatively describe infant and child mortality rates during the EEA.

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