Found 1967 Hypotheses across 197 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Population pressure, indicated by above-median population density for a given subsistence type, will be positively associated with warfare (27).Nolan, Patrick D. - Toward an ecological-evolutionary theory of the incidence of warfare in prei..., 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article reassesses the question of relative peacefulness/violence of preindustrial societies. It tests two materialist theories suggesting that more advanced subsistence techniques and population pressure will increase the likelihood of warfare.

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  2. Presence and elaborateness of menarcheal ceremonies are negatively associated with dichotomized 'high-value' (agricultural, pastoral, & advanced horticultural) vs. 'low-value' (hunting-gathering, fishing, mounted hunting, & simple horticultural) subsistence strategies (109).Paige, Jeffery M. - The politics of reproductive ritual, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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  3. Circumcision is positively associated with dichotomized 'high-value' (agricultural, pastoral, & advanced horticultural) vs. 'low-value' (hunting-gathering, fishing, mounted hunting, & simple horticultural) subsistence strategies (76).Paige, Jeffery M. - The politics of reproductive ritual, 1981 - 0 Variables

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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  4. Play group contact will be more common in hunting, gathering, and fishing societies than it is in “at least some more advanced subsistence types.”Konner, Melvin J. - Relations among infants and juveniles in comparative perspective, 1976 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates peer relations in infancy, both in primates and in preindustrial human societies. Data from these populations shows a strong tendency toward a multi-age composition of play groups rather than solely peer-aged play groups for infants. Patterns in child care across societies of different subsistence types are empirically examined.

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  5. Foragers will have less warfare than societies with other subsistence strategies (6).Ember, Carol R. - Violence in the ethnographic record: results of cross-cultural research on w..., 1997 - 2 Variables

    This paper reviews the results of the author's cross-cultural studies of war and aggression and their implications for prehistory.

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  6. Community permeability (accessibility to households) will have a linear correlation with frequency of war (358)Peregrine, Peter N. - Raoul Naroll's Contribution to Archaeology, 1994 - 2 Variables

    An extension of the author's 1993 study, An Archaeological Correlate of War, this study examines the relationship between community permeability and war in the ethnographic record using Naroll's study on household and population as a model with the aim of making inferences to the archaeological record.

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  7. Fraternal interest group strength is positively associated with dichotomized 'high-value' (agricultural, pastoral, & advanced horticultural) vs. 'low-value' (hunting-gathering, fishing, mounted hunting, & simple horticultural) subsistence strategies (76).Paige, Jeffery M. - The politics of reproductive ritual, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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  8. Maternal pregnancy restrictions are significantly positively associated with dichotomized 'high-value' (agricultural, pastoral, & advanced horticultural) vs. 'low-value' (hunting-gathering, fishing, mounted hunting, & simple horticultural) subsistence strategies (203).Paige, Jeffery M. - The politics of reproductive ritual, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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  9. Couvade is negatively associated with dichotomized 'high-value' (agricultural, pastoral, & advanced horticultural) vs. 'low-value' (hunting-gathering, fishing, mounted hunting, & simple horticultural) subsistence strategies (203).Paige, Jeffery M. - The politics of reproductive ritual, 1981 - 2 Variables

    This book investigates reproductive rituals in preindustrial societies. Major theories are discussed, and cross-cultural tests of several variables (fraternal interest groups, menarcheal ceremonies, puberty ceremonies, residence, circumcision, birth practices, segregation practices, etc.) are conducted.

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  10. The infant/child's age at the cessation of breastfeeding is lower in preindustrial populations with agricultural or pastoral subsistence type than in hunting and gathering socieities (p. 50).Sellen, Daniel W. - Relationships between subsistence and age at weaning in "preindustrial" soci..., 2001 - 2 Variables

    This study tests the weaning food availability hypothesis, that both the introduction of foods other than breastmilk and the cessation of breastfeeding will vary by society's subsistence type. This hypothesis has implications for demography, as accelerated weaning can lead to increases in both mothers' fertility (due to decreased birth intervals) and infant mortality (due to the presence of pathogens in new foods).

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