Found 1678 Hypotheses across 168 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. The sororal polygyny complex: hypotheses relate a) husbands' and wives' relative generation of wealth, b) husbands and wives autonomous residences, c) sororal mode of polygyny, and d) the husband's responsibility to attract new wives.White, Douglas R. - Rethinking polygyny: co-wives, codes, and cultural systems, 1988 - 1 Variables

    This article "focuses on internal relationships in the organization of polygynous systems." The author presents new codes for polygyny and tests hypotheses regarding "complexes" of polygynous variables: wealth-increasing polygyny and sororal polygyny. It is asserted that polygyny is produced by a variety of factors and circumstances, and that regional historical, demographic, and ecological forces require attention in order to understand its acceptance and practice.

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  2. Agricultural populations will show a reduced rate of polygyny and increased rates of monogamy relative to other subsistence systems (3)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  3. Polygyny will be positively associated with low husband-wife intimacy (322)de Munck, Victor C. - Wife-husband intimacy and female status in cross-cultural perspective, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article examines predictors of intimacy between husbands and wives. Emphasis is on equality of spouses. A causal model is presented.

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  4. Presence of plow animals will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 705).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  5. Female contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 702).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  6. Intensity of agriculture will be negatively associated with marital structure (p. 706).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  7. Stratified agricultural economies will be associated with diminishing marginal fitness returns provided by additional polygynous wives which prevent men from having as many wives as their wealth might otherwise predict (2)Ross, Cody T. - Greater wealth inequality, less polygyny: rethinking the polygyny threshold ..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors reconsider the polygyny threshold model in order to account for the "polygyny paradox." This paradox, as the authors define it, is the trend away from polygyny as societies adopt stratified agricultural economies. This is despite an increase in both the importance of material wealth and greater leaves of wealth inequality both of which would otherwise suggest increased polygyny. The authors develop a new model that does account for this paradox.

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  8. In societies where wife-lending or wife-exchange is common, polygyny will be prevalent (243, 279).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  9. A male-skewed sex ratio will be associated with non-classical polyandry (p. 152).Starkweather, Katherine E. - A survey of non-classical polyandry, 2012 - 2 Variables

    This article explores determinants of non-classical polyandry, which the authors assert is more common than is usually conveyed. Results indicate that societies with non-classical polyandry tend to be small scale and egalitarian, practice hunting and gathering or horticulture, and have a male-skewed sex ratio. Overall polyandry is thought to add to the reproductive fitness of both men and women.

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  10. "A long postpartum taboo will be associated least frequently with monogamy and increasingly frequently with family forms characterized by increasing isolation of the wife from her husband and the rest of the household" (246)Saucier, Jean-Francois - Correlates of the long post-partum taboo: a cross-cultural study, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates correlates of the post-partum sex taboo. Empirical analysis identifies several predictors, from extensive agriculture to localized kin groups. The authors suggest that the taboo imposes a burden on women and unmarried or monogamous young men, and it is best maintained in a community in which elders are in firm control and married women are considered outsiders due to village exogamy.

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