Found 1326 Hypotheses across 133 Pages (0.04 seconds)
  1. "Societies with predominantly aggressive deities and with high pain in the treatment of infants have capricious gods; societies with . . . benevolent deities and with low pain in infant treatment lack capricious gods" (167)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. "High self reliance, independence training . . . and control of behavior of children through punishment (highlighted in the rigidity score) [are characteristic of societies which believe in] aggressive deities" (164, 166)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 4 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. "Societies with beliefs in aggressive supernaturals . . . had fewer nurturant agents, protected the infant less from environmental discomforts, showed him less affection, were more inconsistent in caring for his needs, and took less care of his needs" (168)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 5 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. "[There is a relationship] between subsistence insecurity and the properties of deities, . . . [and between properties of the deities and] extreme cold or extreme heat conditions" (167)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 3 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. "A clear relationship between absence of pain from nurturing agent in infancy and [belief of predominant benevolence of] . . . supernaturals is shown" (164)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. "Mothers visit pain upon children as a displaced aggression arising from the frustrations of particularly low status" (168)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. "The greater the initial satisfaction of the oral drive the greater the degree to which supernatural nurturance is contingent upon the employment of compulsive ritual" (200)Spiro, Melford E. - A cross-cultural study of some supernatural beliefs, 1967 - 3 Variables

    This article examines the relationship between child training and supernatural beliefs. The authors develop a schema delineating the role of the supernatural in nurturance and punishment; ten hypotheses associating the role of the supernatural with various child training practices are tested. Several are confirmed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. "The lower the socialization of dependence, the greater the degree to which supernatural nurturance is noncontingent" (200)Spiro, Melford E. - A cross-cultural study of some supernatural beliefs, 1967 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationship between child training and supernatural beliefs. The authors develop a schema delineating the role of the supernatural in nurturance and punishment; ten hypotheses associating the role of the supernatural with various child training practices are tested. Several are confirmed.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. "Games of chance will occur in societies [where the gods are regarded as] high in benevolence, low in aggression [and can be] coerced" (602)Roberts, John M. - Games in culture, 1959 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between game types (physical, strategy, and chance) and social, religious, and geographic variables. Hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. "The greater the initial satisfaction of dependence, the greater the degree to which supernatural nurturance is contingent upon compulsive ritual" (199)Spiro, Melford E. - A cross-cultural study of some supernatural beliefs, 1967 - 3 Variables

    This article examines the relationship between child training and supernatural beliefs. The authors develop a schema delineating the role of the supernatural in nurturance and punishment; ten hypotheses associating the role of the supernatural with various child training practices are tested. Several are confirmed.

    Related HypothesesCite