Found 3774 Hypotheses across 378 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Matrilineal forms of descent will be positively associated with the introduction of trade in a world-system (101, 105).Peregrine, Peter N. - Trade and matrilineality: a hypothesis based on world-systems theory, 1994 - 2 Variables

    This article investigates whether trade with a world-system influences descent and residence rules in non-state societies. Data suggest that involvement in the capitalist world economy is associated with matrilineal forms of descent and residence, likely because men will be encouraged to leave their communities to participate in trade labor.

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  2. Societies that were more corporate were predicted to be more resilient to climate change during the Late Antique Little Ice Age than those that were more exclusionary.Peregrine, Peter N. - Social resilience to nuclear winter: lessons from the Late Antique Little Ic..., 2021 - 2 Variables

    The author analyzes conditions that might favor social resilience during the Late Antique Little Ice Age (ca. 536-556 CE). The assumption is made that climatic conditions in the Northern Hemisphere during this period of time are very similar to those that would occur during a nuclear winter. These conditions include a drop in temperature and decreased solar radiation from volcanic eruptions. Measures for social resilience come from multiple variables for social change, which are tested against measures for type of political engagement. It is argued that broad political participation is correlated with resilience.

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  3. Advances in craft specialization are positively associated with political centralization (1).Peregrine, Peter N. - Some political aspects of craft specialization, 1991 - 2 Variables

    This article discusses the reasons behind advances in craft specialization particularly why there is a relationship between advances in craft specialization and the emergence of powerful elites. Hypothesis tests focused on political centralization.

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  4. "Bilocal, neolocal and, possibly, matrilocal residence patterns should be associated with a high level of drunkenness while patrilocal societies should be associated with a low level of drunkenness" (23)Davis, William N. - A cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This study examines the influence of the "child-adult" conflict on the frequency of drunkenness in a culture. In particular, the author examines the socio-psychological factors that can induce a child-adult conflict, claiming that this conflict may be more common when mothers are the primary dispensers of rewards.

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  5. Genital mutilation/cutting is associated with patrilocality and patrilineality.Šaffa, Gabriel - Global phylogenetic analysis reveals multiple origins and correlates of geni..., 2022 - 9 Variables

    This study is a comprehensive analysis of female and male genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C and MGM/C) practices, including their history and socio-ecological correlates, using a phylogenetic cross-cultural framework. It employed two global ethnographic samples, the Ethnographic Atlas (EA) and the Standard Cross-Cultural Sample (SCCS), and two subsets of the phylogeny (supertree) of human populations based on genetic and linguistic data, to investigate the variables that may have led to the introduction of these practices, and to determine where and when they may have originated. The study suggests that MGM/C probably originated in polygynous societies with separate residence for co-wives, supporting a mate-guarding function, and that FGM/C likely originated subsequently and almost exclusively in societies already practicing MGM/C, where it may have become a signal of chastity. Both practices are believed to have originated multiple times, some as early as in the mid-Holocene (5,000–7,000 years ago). The study posits that GM/C co-evolves with and may help maintain fundamental social structures and that the high fitness costs of FGM/C are offset by social benefits, such as enhanced marriageability and social capital.

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  6. There will be an association between greater population stability (resilience) to climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented rather than exclusionary-oriented.Peregrine, Peter N. - Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian Societies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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  7. There will be an association between higher health and nutrition stability (resilience) to climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented societies rather than exclusionary-oriented.Peregrine, Peter N. - Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian Societies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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  8. There will be an association between greater conflict stability (resilience) to climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented rather than exclusionary-oriented.Peregrine, Peter N. - Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian Societies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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  9. There will be an association between greater household organization stability (resilience) to climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented rather than exclusionary-oriented.Peregrine, Peter N. - Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian Societies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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  10. There will be an association between greater village organization stability (resilience) to climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented rather than exclusionary-oriented.Peregrine, Peter N. - Political Participation and Long-Term Resilience in Pre-Colombian Societies, 2017 - 2 Variables

    The present study investigates whether there is resilience variability following climate-related disasters in societies that are corporate-oriented, which promote participatory and inclusive structures, and exclusionary-oriented, which limit political authority and power. The findings offer modest support for social resilience theory that more flexible (i.e. more participatory) societies would be more resilient after a disaster than less flexible societies. Although only 5 of 14 correlations are significant, the direction is significant by a binomial sign test.

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