Found 2861 Hypotheses across 287 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Community permeability (accessibility to households) will have a linear correlation with frequency of war (358)Peregrine, Peter N. - Raoul Naroll's Contribution to Archaeology, 1994 - 2 Variables

    An extension of the author's 1993 study, An Archaeological Correlate of War, this study examines the relationship between community permeability and war in the ethnographic record using Naroll's study on household and population as a model with the aim of making inferences to the archaeological record.

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  2. Changes in conflict post climate disaster will be positively associated with increases in population, community scale and complexity, and lower regional scale and complexity.Peregrine, Peter N. - Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses us..., 2018 - 4 Variables

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

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  3. Degree of taxation and degree elites received taxes will be positively related to higher conflict following climate-related disasters.Peregrine, Peter N. - Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses us..., 2018 - 4 Variables

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

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  4. More exclusionary polities (vs. more corporate) will predict more conflict following climate-related disasters.Peregrine, Peter N. - Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses us..., 2018 - 2 Variables

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

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  5. Where leaders promote collectivity and reduction of competition there will be less conflict following climate-related disasters.Peregrine, Peter N. - Reducing post-disaster conflict: a cross cultural test of four hypotheses us..., 2018 - 3 Variables

    This article uses pre-defined criteria to sample 22 archaeological climate-related disasters from 9 distinct regions from eHRAF Archaeology. It quantitatively tests four hypotheses regarding change in conflict following climate-related disasters using multiple regression analyses and backwards stepwise regression. Findings demonstrate association between political strategy/authority decision making and degree of post climate disaster conflict.

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  6. Societies with more corporate political strategies are more resilient to catastrophic climate-related disastersPeregrine, Peter N. - Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test ..., 2017 - 8 Variables

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

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  7. Societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to catastrophic climate-related disastersPeregrine, Peter N. - Social resilience to climate-related disasters in ancient societies: a test ..., 2017 - 8 Variables

    In the present study, Peregrine tests two perspectives regarding social resilience to climate-related disasters: 1) that societies with more inclusive and participatory political structures (corporate political strategies) are more resilient to climate-related disasters, and 2) that societies with tighter adherence to social norms are more resilient to climate-related disasters. Results support the notion that societies with greater political participation are more socially resilient to catastrophic climate-related disasters. Because these results are justifiably generalizable across multiple historical and cultural contexts, Peregrine's findings are a useful contribution to aid in disaster response policy decision making.

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  8. Societies that were more corporate were predicted to be more resilient to climate change during the Late Antique Little Ice Age than those that were more exclusionary.Peregrine, Peter N. - Social resilience to nuclear winter: lessons from the Late Antique Little Ic..., 2021 - 2 Variables

    The author analyzes conditions that might favor social resilience during the Late Antique Little Ice Age (ca. 536-556 CE). The assumption is made that climatic conditions in the Northern Hemisphere during this period of time are very similar to those that would occur during a nuclear winter. These conditions include a drop in temperature and decreased solar radiation from volcanic eruptions. Measures for social resilience come from multiple variables for social change, which are tested against measures for type of political engagement. It is argued that broad political participation is correlated with resilience.

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  9. In the prehistoric New World, the percentage of South American settlements in with a population over 400 will be positively associated with the same measure for Mesoamerican settlements 200 years earlier (9).Peregrine, Peter N. - Synchrony in the new world: an example of archaeoethnology, 2006 - 1 Variables

    This article employs archaeoethnology to investigate possible patterns of synchronous population growth among cities of the prehistoric New World. The author finds a pattern of settlement synchrony distinct from a pattern found in the prehistoric Old World, suggesting that global climate change may not be a key factor in understanding settlement synchrony. Macroregional political and economic processes such as long-distance trade are offered as partial explanations of settlement synchrony in the New World.

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  10. Cultures with dwelling floor areas less than 80 meters-squared (indicator of patrilocality) are associated with more complex ceramic designs than cultures with dwelling floor areas more than 80 meters-squared (indicator of non-patrilocality) (227)Peregrine, Peter N. - Cultural correlates of ceramic styles, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This study replicates John L. Fischer's (1961) cross-cultural analysis to demonstrate the correlation between art styles and social hierarchy and postmarital residence. The author suggests that archaeological ceramics might be used to predict social characteristics of prehistoric societies.

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