Found 4706 Hypotheses across 471 Pages (0.04 seconds)
  1. Female contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 702).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  2. Presence of plow animals will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 705).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

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  3. Autonomy in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  4. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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  5. Plow agriculture will be negatively associated with presence of polygyny (265).Korotayev, Andrey V. - Explaining current fertility dynamics in tropical Africa from an anthropolog..., 2016 - 2 Variables

    This paper presents tests of the relationships between tropical African agriculture and cultural variables regulating reproduction in order to examine a theory which suggests that the lagging or absence of tropical Africa's demographic transition is the result of pervasive 'pro-natal' cultural practices. Strength of association between these factors and non-plow agriculture, the traditional method of farming in tropical Africa, leads the authors to suggest that women's larger subsistence role in these societies favors extended family households in which child-rearing responsibilities can be shared, and polygynous marriage systems in which co-wives can contribute substantially to the family's labor productivity. These, along with erosion of regulations on postpartum sex and birth spacing which were prevalent prior to modernization, are identified as characterstics which have and will continue to resist fertility decline.

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  6. Wives’ power and wives’ proportionate contribution to subsistence will be negatively associated with cultural complexity (31-2).Lee, Gary R. - Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal cultures, 1983 - 3 Variables

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

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  7. Agricultural type and intensity will be curvilinearly related to women's contribution to subsistence; women will contribute the least in societies without agriculture and with intensive agriculture (1691).Sanday, Peggy Reeves - Toward a theory of the status of women, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This study tests an ecological-economic theory of female contribution to subsistence, focusing on subsistence type as a potential correlate. In an exploratory analysis, 28 independent variables (not all listed below) are examined. The relationship between female contribution to subsistence and female status is also examined.

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  8. Higher status of the elderly will be associated with agricultural rather than exploitative economies, extended rather than nuclear family organization, inheritance of real property, and patrilocal rather than other residence patterns (270).Lee, Gary R. - Status of the elderly: economic and familial antecedents, 1984 - 5 Variables

    This article investigates how status of the elderly is affected by economic type, family organization, inheritance of real property, and unilocal residence patterns. Multivariate analysis ultimately suggests that agricultural economy, patrilocal residence, and fully extended family systems are significant predictors of higher status of the elderly. No major gender differences were discovered.

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  9. Intensive agriculture, as compared to simpler agriculture, will be positively associated with increases in women's domestic work (288)Ember, Carol R. - The relative decline in women’s contributions to agriculture with intensific..., 1983 - 2 Variables

    This article presents theory and hypothesis tests that suggest that the decline of women's contribution to intensive agriculture is related to increases in fertility and domestic work associated with cereal crops. Additionally, men in agricultural societies are less likely to invest time in hunting and warfare, so their contribution of agricultural labor relative to women's increases.

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  10. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with the prevalence of extended families (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

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