Found 4466 Hypotheses across 447 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. A male-skewed sex ratio will be associated with non-classical polyandry (p. 152).Starkweather, Katherine E. - A survey of non-classical polyandry, 2012 - 2 Variables

    This article explores determinants of non-classical polyandry, which the authors assert is more common than is usually conveyed. Results indicate that societies with non-classical polyandry tend to be small scale and egalitarian, practice hunting and gathering or horticulture, and have a male-skewed sex ratio. Overall polyandry is thought to add to the reproductive fitness of both men and women.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Subsistence types with higher technology levels (advanced horticulture, agrarian) will have more warfare than those with lower technology levels (simple horticulture, hunting and gathering) (28).Nolan, Patrick D. - Toward an ecological-evolutionary theory of the incidence of warfare in prei..., 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article reassesses the question of relative peacefulness/violence of preindustrial societies. It tests two materialist theories suggesting that more advanced subsistence techniques and population pressure will increase the likelihood of warfare.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Hunter-gatherers, if they have class stratification, tend to base it on wealth (51, 106).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Societies with unreliable food supplies and undeveloped food storage technology will tend to have plump standards of female beauty (215).Anderson, Judith L. - Was the Duchess of Windsor right?: A cross-cultural review of the socioecolo..., 1992 - 2 Variables

    Cultures vary widely in regards to beauty standards for female body fat: while industrialized nations typically prefer thinness in women, ethnographic reports indicate that plumpness is valued in many small-scale societies. Here the authors evaluate several hypotheses that relate variation in female body fat preference to variation in socioecology such as food storage, climate, male social dominance, valuation and restriction of women's work, and female stress during adolescence.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Hunter-gatherers tend to live in communities without a city or town and with less than 200 people (51, 81).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 3 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Homosexuality will be more prevalent in agropastoral than in hunting-gathering societies when controlling for social stratification. (7)Apostolou, Menelaos - Is homosexuality more prevalent in agropastoral than in hunting and gatherin..., 2016 - 4 Variables

    The researcher predicts a positive association between prevalence of homosexuality and agricultural and pastoral subsistence types, reasoning that higher frequency of arranged marriages among agropastoral societies will lessen negative selection pressure on genes which encode for non-exclusive heterosexual orientation. Findings appear to support the prediction.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Hunter-gatherers tend not to have social stratification (51, 102).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. ". . . Tribes with very primitive hunting and gathering economies tend to have more drunkenness than tribes with more advanced herding and agricultural economies" (52)Field, Peter B. - A new cross-cultural study of drunkenness, 1962 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter builds on Horton's 1943 psychoanalytical study of drunkenness. The author tests an overall theory that drunkenness, which facilitates personal and uninhibited interactions, is more acceptable, and therefore prevalent, in societies with loose, rather than rigid, social relationships. Indicators of social rigidity, such as strict socialization or male dominance through patrilocality, are tested for relationships to drunkenness.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Hunter-gatherers tend to have lower social complexity (51,91).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

    Related HypothesesCite