Found 3741 Hypotheses across 375 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. A male-skewed sex ratio will be associated with non-classical polyandry (p. 152).Starkweather, Katherine E. - A survey of non-classical polyandry, 2012 - 2 Variables

    This article explores determinants of non-classical polyandry, which the authors assert is more common than is usually conveyed. Results indicate that societies with non-classical polyandry tend to be small scale and egalitarian, practice hunting and gathering or horticulture, and have a male-skewed sex ratio. Overall polyandry is thought to add to the reproductive fitness of both men and women.

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  2. Specific patterns of subsistence strategies exist.Ahedo, Virginia - Let's go fishing: A quantitative analysis of subsistence choices with a spec..., 2021 - 5 Variables

    In this study, the authors analyze subsistence economies to better understand their variability and success, the role of the environment in different subsistence choices, and the relevance of fishing, specifically in mixed economies. They find regular subsistence patterns, suggesting that not all subsistence combinations are successful. Their findings also indicate that environment influences subsistence choice, mixed economies are common, and that fishing plays a key role in mixed economies.

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  3. "Large sex difference in socialization is associated with an economy that places high premium on the superior strength and superior development of motor skills requiring strength which characterize the male" (330)Barry III, Herbert - A cross cultural survey of some sex differences in socialization, 1957 - 6 Variables

    This paper explores sex differences in socialization for boys and girls after describing the worldwide distribution of sex differences in five aspects of socialization; the authors explore conditions that may produce larger differences.

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  4. Subsistence types with higher technology levels (advanced horticulture, agrarian) will have more warfare than those with lower technology levels (simple horticulture, hunting and gathering) (28).Nolan, Patrick D. - Toward an ecological-evolutionary theory of the incidence of warfare in prei..., 2003 - 2 Variables

    This article reassesses the question of relative peacefulness/violence of preindustrial societies. It tests two materialist theories suggesting that more advanced subsistence techniques and population pressure will increase the likelihood of warfare.

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  5. Subsistence based primarily on hunting-gathering will be associated with extensive kinship systems, whereas agropastoralism will be associated with intensive ones (384).Walker, Robert S. - Marrying kin in small‐scale societies, 2014 - 4 Variables

    The authors examine degree of intensiveness (kin-relatedness) among foraging and agropastoralist societies, predicting that hunter-gatherers will pursue more extensive kinship networks in order to maximize residential options in the case of unpredictability or uneven geographic distribution of food resources. Support is found for the hypothesis, and it is suggested that while extensive fission-fusion dynamics are beneficial in foraging systems, the increase in cooperation in large-scale agricultural settlements is aided by norms which encourage kin marriage and relatedness.

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  6. Hunter-gatherers, if they have class stratification, tend to base it on wealth (51, 106).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  7. "Food production and social stratification do not, jointly, constitute a sufficient condition for the existence of monogamy" (1463)Chaney, Richard P. - Typology and patterning: Spiro's sample re-examined, 1966 - 3 Variables

    This article suggests that Spiro's (1965) study on typology of social structure used a biased cross-cultural sample and possibly obscured regional patterns in data. Hypotheses related to marital structure, descent rules, food production and social stratification are tested.

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  8. Hunter-gatherers tend to live in communities without a city or town and with less than 200 people (51, 81).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Hunter-Gatherers, 1967 - 3 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on societies where subsistence is primarily by 'food gathering' which includes hunting, fishing, and gathering.

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  9. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  10. Diversity and complexity of toolkits used by farming and herding groups will be positively associated with risk of resource failure (2).Collard, Mark - Risk of resource failure and toolkit variation in small-scale farmers and he..., 2012 - 11 Variables

    Prior research by Oswalt (1973, 1976) and Torrence (1983, 2001) has suggested that risk of resource failure is a significant predictor of toolkit complexity and diversity among hunter-gatherers. In this paper, the same relationship is tested among small-scale herding and farming groups. However, no significant correlation is discovered between any measure of resource risk and any measure of toolkit complexity. The researchers suggest that this absence may be the result of greater reliance on non-technological diversification methods among farmers (i.e. spatial diversification, mixed farming, intercropping), or of other unaccounted-for sources of risk (i.e. intergroup raiding and warfare).

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