Found 2024 Hypotheses across 203 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Population pressure (measured by population density) will be associated with increased male agricultural participation and decreased female agricultural participation (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  2. The presence of the plow will decrease female contribution to agriculture (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  3. Dependence on tree crops will be associated with decreased female participation in agriculture (577).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  4. Production of cereal crops will be associated with decreased female contribution to agriculture (574).Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  5. A high degree of dependence on domesticated animals will decrease female agricultural contributions.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  6. Dependence on root crops will be associated with increased female contribution to agriculture.Burton, Michael L. - Sexual division of labor in agriculture, 1984 - 2 Variables

    Authors Michael Burton and Douglas White present and test an ecological model for the process of agricultural intensification that aims to explain variance in (and the reduction in) female contribution to agriculture. The model synthesizes and expands upon findings put forth by previous studies in order to create a more comprehensive design. Results suggest that the strongest predictors of female contribution to agriculture are the number of dry months, the importance of domesticated animals to subsistence, and the use of the plow in farming. Crop type, although a weaker predictor, is also supported.

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  7. Division of labor is examined as relating to economy of effort and nursing constraints.Burton, Michael L. - A model of the sexual division of labor, 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study presents a model of sexual division of labor using entailment analysis that accounts for distance of the task away from home and danger of the task. Results support the notion that childbirth and nursing are the main constraints on the sexual division of labor and that men tend to be allocated tasks that are more distant and dangerous.

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  8. Traditional plough agriculture will be associated with lower overall female participation in agriculture (481).Alesina, Alberto - On the origins of gender roles: Women and the plough, 2013 - 7 Variables

    There is considerable variation both within and across societies in attitudes towards female employment outside of the household. In some societies, the dominant belief is that women should have equal opportunity to work outside the home, while in others women are strongly discouraged from working outside of the domestic sphere. Here the authors use pre-industrial ethnographic data and contemporary observations of gender inequality to test the hypothesis that cultural attitudes regarding the appropriateness of women working outside of the household are rooted in the ancestral adoption of plough cultivation. Contemporary measures of gender inequality assess variation across countries, ethnic groups, and individuals.

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  9. Traditional plough agriculture will be associated with lower female participation in land clearance (481).Alesina, Alberto - On the origins of gender roles: Women and the plough, 2013 - 7 Variables

    There is considerable variation both within and across societies in attitudes towards female employment outside of the household. In some societies, the dominant belief is that women should have equal opportunity to work outside the home, while in others women are strongly discouraged from working outside of the domestic sphere. Here the authors use pre-industrial ethnographic data and contemporary observations of gender inequality to test the hypothesis that cultural attitudes regarding the appropriateness of women working outside of the household are rooted in the ancestral adoption of plough cultivation. Contemporary measures of gender inequality assess variation across countries, ethnic groups, and individuals.

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  10. Traditional plough agriculture will be associated with lower female participation in soil preparation (481).Alesina, Alberto - On the origins of gender roles: Women and the plough, 2013 - 7 Variables

    There is considerable variation both within and across societies in attitudes towards female employment outside of the household. In some societies, the dominant belief is that women should have equal opportunity to work outside the home, while in others women are strongly discouraged from working outside of the domestic sphere. Here the authors use pre-industrial ethnographic data and contemporary observations of gender inequality to test the hypothesis that cultural attitudes regarding the appropriateness of women working outside of the household are rooted in the ancestral adoption of plough cultivation. Contemporary measures of gender inequality assess variation across countries, ethnic groups, and individuals.

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