Found 1202 Hypotheses across 121 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. Witchcraft beliefs will be positively associated with the inculcation of traits associated with toughness (aggressiveness, fortitude, and competitiveness) among childrenGershman, Boris - Witchcraft beliefs and the erosion of social capital: Evidence from Sub-Saha..., 2016 - 4 Variables

    In this article, the author seeks to understand the effect of witchcraft beliefs (both personal and regional) on various measures of social capital. Through empirical tests, the author concludes that witchcraft beliefs are robustly associated with anti-social attitudes in 19 Sub-Saharan African countries. Specifically, they find that witchcraft and other supernatural beliefs significantly affect levels of both generalized trust and trust for people of other religions. They also find that these attitudes are present among second-generation immigrants to Europe who originate from these countries. The worldwide Standard Cross-Cultural Sample is also used to examine relationships between witchcraft, mistrust, and other anti-social behaviors.

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  2. "There are no significant correlations between either crime or aggression and: the childhood variables of responsibility, self reliance, independence . . . and aggression satisfaction and anxiety in childhood . . ." (265)Allen, Martin G. - A cross-cultural study of aggression and crime, 1972 - 6 Variables

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  3. "Games of chance occur in the presence of antecedent conflict, particularly in the areas of sex, aggression, achievement, and possibly responsibility" (143)Roberts, John M. - Cross-cultural correlates of games of chance, 1966 - 5 Variables

    Authors investigate the cross-cultural correlates of games of chance. They advance a "conflict-enculturation" model to explain why individuals choose to engage in games of chance in particular (as opposed to games of strategy or physical skill). They suggest that games of chance are linked to cultures with antecedent conflict and/or feelings of powerlessness in the presence of uncertainty; both are psychological stressors whose effects may be assuaged by play with uncertainty models in the form of games of chance.

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  4. ". . . evil eye societies are more likely to provide positive training for young boys in industry, responsibility, sexual restraint, obedience, and physical aggression and they are less likely to provide positive training in trust" (255)Roberts, John M. - Belief in the evil eye in world perspective, 1976 - 7 Variables

    This chapter examines the variables that are associated with the evil eye belief cross-culturally. Results suggest that the evil eye belief is significantly associated with various socioeconomic and demographic variables. All hypotheses are supported.

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  5. Responsibility, self reliance, achievement, or independence training in childhood will be related to directness of adult aggression (263)Allen, Martin G. - A cross-cultural study of aggression and crime, 1972 - 5 Variables

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  6. Witchcraft beliefs will be significantly associated with the inculcation of other traits (obedience, self-restraint, and industry) among childrenGershman, Boris - Witchcraft beliefs and the erosion of social capital: Evidence from Sub-Saha..., 2016 - 4 Variables

    In this article, the author seeks to understand the effect of witchcraft beliefs (both personal and regional) on various measures of social capital. Through empirical tests, the author concludes that witchcraft beliefs are robustly associated with anti-social attitudes in 19 Sub-Saharan African countries. Specifically, they find that witchcraft and other supernatural beliefs significantly affect levels of both generalized trust and trust for people of other religions. They also find that these attitudes are present among second-generation immigrants to Europe who originate from these countries. The worldwide Standard Cross-Cultural Sample is also used to examine relationships between witchcraft, mistrust, and other anti-social behaviors.

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  7. "Frequency of Theft is also positively correlated with socialization anxiety during the period of childhood with respect to the following areas of training: Responsibility, Self-Reliance, Achievement and Obedience" (296).Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of correlates of crime, 1963 - 5 Variables

    Causal factors to the development of crime are examined. Frequency of theft and personal crime are tested against these causal factors in a search for correlations.

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  8. "Average anxiety and childhood achievement correlate negatively to crime" (264-265)Allen, Martin G. - A cross-cultural study of aggression and crime, 1972 - 3 Variables

    The relationships of aggression and crime to variables of childhood experience, adult behavior, and social structure are cross-culturally analyzed.

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  9. "Pressures toward achievement and self-reliance would be associated with frequent drunkenness" (38)Bacon, Margaret K. - A cross-cultural study of drinking: ii. relations to other features of culture, 1965 - 8 Variables

    This study explores cultural variables associated with frequency of drunkenness and ceremonial drinking. Particular attention was paid to childhood socialization variables, as well as politcal and social organization. Results show a low correlation between frequency of drunkenness and frequency of ceremonial drinking, and various other variables are associated with each.

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  10. "Extensiveness of menstrual taboo observed in a primitive society is determined to a significant extent by the average intensity of castration anxiety felt by men [as measured by child rearing practices]"Stephens, William N. - A cross cultural study of menstrual taboos, 1967 - 6 Variables

    This study tests the relationship between menstrual taboos and castration anxiety. The author posits that the extensiveness of menstrual taboos is determined by the average castration anxiety. Using various measures of castration anxiety, the author finds significant support for this hypothesis.

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