Found 1822 Hypotheses across 183 Pages (0.033 seconds)
  1. Active high gods will be more likely in societies with patrilocal marital residence, patrilineal descent, and transfer of wife to husband’s group after marriage (321). This will be true when individually controlling for society size (jurisdictional hierarchy), stratification, region, and religion.Roes, Frans L. - Permanent group membership, 2014 - 9 Variables

    This article reviews the theory that permanent animal groups have only one sex breed outside the group in order to balance genetic diversity and group relatedness. The author theorises that since males inherit valuable membership in patrilocal/lineal societies, they are expected to be more concerned about the probability of paternity than males in matrilocal/lineal societies. Moral rules, and specifically belief in moralizing gods, are expected to reflect this difference. In other words, moralizing gods are used to restrict the sexual activity of women.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Controlling on economic and political factors, the effect of marital residence and descent on sexual dominance will approach zero (679)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Societies in which high gods are more active and concerned with human morality will be more loyal to the local and wider community (421).Johnson, Dominic D.P. - God's punishment and public goods, 2005 - 3 Variables

    This study tests the relationship between supernatural punishment (indexed by the importance of moralizing "high gods") and several proxy measures of cooperation. Results suggest that the presence of high gods is associated with money and credit, credit source, community size, jurisdictional hierarchy beyond the local community, and sanctions.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Controlling on marital residence and descent, the effect of economic and political factors to sexual dominance will approach zero (680)Johnson, G. David - A cross-cultural test of Collins’ theory of sexual stratification, 1982 - 6 Variables

    This article tests Randall Collin's 1975 theory that political-economic factors, rather than family/kinship factors, predict the degree of sexual stratification in a given society. A multivariate model is tested and findings contradict the theory.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Games of strategy will be more common in societies where political power is based on a "network strategy" (386).Peregrine, Peter N. - Political strategy and cross-cultural variation in games, 2008 - 4 Variables

    This study tests the hypotheses that games of strategy will be more prevalent in societies where political power is based on a "network strategy" and that network societies place more value on the enculturation of obedience in children. Both hypotheses are supported.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. High political complexity has coevolved with moralizing high gods (2, 5)Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. The presence of moralizing high gods facilitates and sustains high political complexity (2, 5).Watts, Joseph - Broad supernatural punishment but not moralizing high gods precede the evolu..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    The authors investigate whether moralizing high gods and, more generally, supernatural punishment precede, sustain, or follow political complexity. The cultural traits at hand are mapped onto phylogenetic trees representing the descent and relatedness of 96 Austronesian cultures.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Findings: A factor analysis of key dimensions to describe a given culture yielded 12 factors. Factor 2, "father-centered family", loaded highly and positively on patrilocal marital residence and bride price; patrilineal kin group; castes present; Circum-Mediterranean, with Afro-Asiatic linguistic affiliation; active high god; and subsistence by animal husbandry. Factor 2 loaded highly and negatively on painful female initiation rites (57)Stewart, Robert A. C. - Cultural dimensions: a factor analysis of textor's a cross-cultural summary, 1972 - 9 Variables

    This article uses factor analysis to identify the key variables underlying the many cross-cultural associations reported by Textor (1967). Twelve factors are identified.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. Levels of jurisdictional hierarchy will vary according to world region (48).Bourguignon, Erika - Diversity and homogeneity in world societies, 1973 - 2 Variables

    This book provides a summary of data available in the Ethnographic Atlas. Social, political, economic, and kinship variables are included, as well as information about religious beliefs, social restrictions, and games. Data is divided into world areas for the purposes of regional comparison.

    Related HypothesesCite