Found 2245 Hypotheses across 225 Pages (0.038 seconds)
  1. There is a positive relationship between the intensity of agriculture practiced and the type of land access system (either individual tenure or communal tenure) (127).Adler, Michael A. - Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  2. The communal tenure of agricultural fields is less likely to occur once population densities reach a certain threshold, no matter what level of agricultural technology, crop, or productive organization (118).Adler, Michael A. - Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  3. There is a positive relationship between the level of leadership and the size of the community (139).Adler, Michael A. - Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  4. There is a relationship between community size and the existence of socially integrative facilities (153).Adler, Michael A. - Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  5. There is a positive relationship between community size and use group size (size of group using an integrative facility) (164).Adler, Michael A. - Communities of Soil and Stone- An Archaeological Investigation of Population..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    The dissertation in its entirety is an archaeological investigation of population aggregation among the Mesa Verde region Anasazi A.D. 900-1300. Chapters four and five of Adlers larger work focus on cross-cultural perspectives to inform discussion around resource access and community strength. Multiple different hypotheses were tested with different data sets, but the HRAF database and Standard Cross Cultural Sample were used throughout.

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  6. The relationship between agriculture intensification and the size of the land tenure group will be curvilinear.Adler, Michael A. - Population aggregation and the Anasazi social landscape: A view from the fou..., 1990 - 2 Variables

    Using both archaeological data from the Mesa Verde region and a Human Relations Area Files random sample of 25 worldwide societies, and another 10 from the American Southwest, the author looked to examine the relationship between changes in community size and settlements, agriculture intensification, and rules governing resource access. In particular the researcher wanted to examine the size of the group that controls the primary access to the main resource. After studying this global sample, the author takes an ethnographic look specifically at the Northern Anasazi in southewestern Colorado.

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  7. Ash serves as a form of witchcraft protection amongst Southwestern and Great Basin cultures.Adler, Michael A. - Fire, Ash, and Sanctuary: Pyrotechnology as Protection in the Precolonial No..., 2021 - 1 Variables

    This survey chapter discusses the use of ash and other fire-generated materials in Ancestral Pueblo settlements in the northern Rio Grande region. The author begins by surveying ethnographic reports of ash use among indigenous groups in the Southwest and Great Basin regions to understand the potential reasons for ash use in prehistoric contexts beyond just cooking. He then turns to archaeological data to explore the extensive use of fire, ash, and other pyrotechnic products across indigenous communities in the region, focusing on excavated architectural and mortuary contexts from the northern Rio Grande, especially the Taos and Picuris areas. The author argues that these fire-related actions and products show that ash plays two major roles -- it is used as a part of major transition ceremonies and as an instrument for healing. The author concludes that these ethnographic observations inform and illuminate archaeological contexts that contain ash, charcoal, and fire.

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  8. Ash serves as a form of infant protection amongst Southwestern and Great Basin cultures.Adler, Michael A. - Fire, Ash, and Sanctuary: Pyrotechnology as Protection in the Precolonial No..., 2021 - 1 Variables

    This survey chapter discusses the use of ash and other fire-generated materials in Ancestral Pueblo settlements in the northern Rio Grande region. The author begins by surveying ethnographic reports of ash use among indigenous groups in the Southwest and Great Basin regions to understand the potential reasons for ash use in prehistoric contexts beyond just cooking. He then turns to archaeological data to explore the extensive use of fire, ash, and other pyrotechnic products across indigenous communities in the region, focusing on excavated architectural and mortuary contexts from the northern Rio Grande, especially the Taos and Picuris areas. The author argues that these fire-related actions and products show that ash plays two major roles -- it is used as a part of major transition ceremonies and as an instrument for healing. The author concludes that these ethnographic observations inform and illuminate archaeological contexts that contain ash, charcoal, and fire.

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  9. Ash is used in healing ceremonies amongst Southwestern and Great Basin cultures.Adler, Michael A. - Fire, Ash, and Sanctuary: Pyrotechnology as Protection in the Precolonial No..., 2021 - 1 Variables

    This survey chapter discusses the use of ash and other fire-generated materials in Ancestral Pueblo settlements in the northern Rio Grande region. The author begins by surveying ethnographic reports of ash use among indigenous groups in the Southwest and Great Basin regions to understand the potential reasons for ash use in prehistoric contexts beyond just cooking. He then turns to archaeological data to explore the extensive use of fire, ash, and other pyrotechnic products across indigenous communities in the region, focusing on excavated architectural and mortuary contexts from the northern Rio Grande, especially the Taos and Picuris areas. The author argues that these fire-related actions and products show that ash plays two major roles -- it is used as a part of major transition ceremonies and as an instrument for healing. The author concludes that these ethnographic observations inform and illuminate archaeological contexts that contain ash, charcoal, and fire.

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  10. Ash is used to beautify infants amongst Southwestern and Great Basin cultures.Adler, Michael A. - Fire, Ash, and Sanctuary: Pyrotechnology as Protection in the Precolonial No..., 2021 - 1 Variables

    This survey chapter discusses the use of ash and other fire-generated materials in Ancestral Pueblo settlements in the northern Rio Grande region. The author begins by surveying ethnographic reports of ash use among indigenous groups in the Southwest and Great Basin regions to understand the potential reasons for ash use in prehistoric contexts beyond just cooking. He then turns to archaeological data to explore the extensive use of fire, ash, and other pyrotechnic products across indigenous communities in the region, focusing on excavated architectural and mortuary contexts from the northern Rio Grande, especially the Taos and Picuris areas. The author argues that these fire-related actions and products show that ash plays two major roles -- it is used as a part of major transition ceremonies and as an instrument for healing. The author concludes that these ethnographic observations inform and illuminate archaeological contexts that contain ash, charcoal, and fire.

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