Found 2494 Hypotheses across 250 Pages (0.006 seconds)
  1. Food production focused on plant-based agriculture should be more likely in more environmentally productive locations (7)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 4 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  2. Degree of environmental productivity will be related to the likelihood of plant-based agriculture versus foraging (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 3 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  3. Topography will predict the dominant subsistence strategy (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  4. Low levels of environmental stability will predict the adoption of animal husbandry compared with foraging (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 4 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  5. Societies that are linguistically similar will be more likely to share dominant subsistence strategies (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  6. Animal husbandry will be more likely to be a dominant subsistence strategy in regions with less productive environments (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  7. Societies that are neighbors will be more likely to share dominant plant-based subsistence strategies (8)Gavin, Michael C. - The global geography of human subsistence, 2018 - 2 Variables

    In this article, the authors seek to determine cross-culturally valid predictors of dominant types of human subsistence around the world. They did this by formulating multiple models that incorporate different combinations of environmental, geographic, and social factors. These models were then used to test various hypotheses posed throughout the anthropological literature surrounding factors that determine dominant subsistence strategies.

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  8. Subsistence type is associated with marriage transactions (211)Apostolou, Menelaos - Bridewealth as an instrument of male parental control over mating: evidence ..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the association between father-son relationships and bridewealth. Bridewealth becomes an instrument through which male parents impose their will on their male offspring. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  9. Groom's reliance on family for marriage transaction is associated with subsistence type (211)Apostolou, Menelaos - Bridewealth as an instrument of male parental control over mating: evidence ..., 2010 - 2 Variables

    This article explores the association between father-son relationships and bridewealth. Bridewealth becomes an instrument through which male parents impose their will on their male offspring. The hypotheses are supported by the results presented.

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  10. Cross-cultural variation in children's degree of childcare (ages 6-10) is linked to predominant subsistence strategy.Ember, Carol R. - Children's play and work: the relevance of cross-cultural ethnographic resea..., 2015 - 2 Variables

    Authors undertook two studies to investigate the natures of work and play cross-culturally in children ages 6-10. The first study investigated potential variables affecting cross-cultural variation in the degree of children's contribution to economic work. The second study investigated the degree to which (and variables affecting why) forms of child's play reflect economic work and/or adult activities across various cultures.

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