Found 2274 Hypotheses across 228 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Kinship tightness will be negatively correlated with the presence of moralizing gods.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  2. Kinship tightness will be negatively correlated with above village level institutions.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  3. Kinship tightness will be positively correlated with pathogen stress (malaria stability).Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  4. Kinship tightness will be positively correlated with village level institutions.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  5. Kinship tightness will be positively correlated with in-group favoritism.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 3 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  6. Kinship tightness will be positively correlated with in-group loyalty.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  7. Kinship tightness will be positively correlated with emotions of disgust.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 2 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  8. According to the model, societies with historically loose kin relationships will regulate cooperation through universal moral values, internalized guilt, altruistic punishment, and moralizing religions.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 5 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  9. According to the model, societies with historically tight kin relationships will regulate cooperation through shared moral values, revenge, emotions of external shame, and notions of purity and disgust.Enke, Benjamin - Kinship, Cooperation, and the Evolution of Moral Systems, 2019 - 5 Variables

    In this paper, the author argues that moral systems evolved as a way to enforce cooperation between people outside of kin groups. Because cooperation within kin groups has apparent adaptive advantages, it is argued that these moral systems will be less important for societies with tight kin groups and conversely more important for those with looser kin groups. In order to test this theory, the author creates an original model that incorporates both ethnographic data and data from contemporary countries. Thus, it is postulated that historical kinship practices will influence contemporary systems. The paper concludes that there is sufficient historical evidence for this theory.

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  10. Material insecurity and number of children will be negatively associated with favorable treatment of a coreligionist in an allocation game (330).Purzycki, Benjamin Grant - Moralistic gods, supernatural punishment and the expansion of human sociality, 2016 - 3 Variables

    Does belief in moralizing and punitive gods promote sociality between coreligionists who are otherwise strangers? A recent dataset of behavioral economic experiment results and demographic and religious data among eight disparate populations allows the researchers to test their hypothesis of a positive association between deity's perceived interest in human morality and favorability of treatment of outsiders who share a religion. Their findings mostly support this hypothesis, which they suggest lends credibility to a theory in which religion encourages cooperation between large groups of people, and is thus a successful product of cultural evolution.

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