Found 1362 Hypotheses across 137 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. ". . . we hypothesized that mothers are more unstable [in mood] when they must spend large amounts of time caring for children" (171-172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  2. ". . . mothers who contribute to the family income, and who therefore have extensive duties other than child care, are less permissive about insubordination from their children than are mothers who are less burdened with chores that are unrelated to their children" (172)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 3 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  3. In early childhood the child is likely to spend half or less of the time with the mother (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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  4. Mothers who raise their children in multiple family dwellings rather than in private dwellings will tend to be more controlled emotionally, as evidenced by low levels of warmth, hostility, praise, and punishment.Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 6 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  5. “… mothers who are unable to escape the intensity of continuous interaction with their children are more likely to reject their offspring than are mothers who can get away from time to time, even if only briefly” (Rohner 1975: 169)Rohner, Ronald P. - They love me, they love me not: a worldwide study of the effects of parental..., 1975 - 2 Variables

    The purpose of this book is to introduce a conceptual and methodological perspective called the "universalist approach," and to use this approach in exploring the pancultural antecedents and affects of parental acceptance-rejection of children,

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  6. Human populations will spend less time grooming than expected based on nonhuman primate patterns (2).Jaeggi, Adrian V. - Human grooming in comparative perspective: People in six small‐scale societi..., 2017 - 1 Variables

    Grooming of conspecifics is thought to play an important social role among nonhuman primates, but the function and relative importance of such grooming among humans is unknown. Here the authors compare time spent grooming and conversing among six small-scale societies with grooming data from 69 nonhuman primate species. They test the hypothesis that conversation evolved among humans as an alternative way to obtain the social benefits (such as building and maintaining social alliances) of grooming in large groups.

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  7. ". . . mothers who have extensive duties besides those of child training will require children to be more responsible than mothers who can devote themselves more exclusively to their children" (173-174)Minturn, Leigh - The antecedents of child training: a cross-cultural test of some hypotheses, 1964 - 2 Variables

    This book chapter examines relationships between the child-training behavior of mothers and the responsibilities of both mothers and others. Child-training behavior is also examined in relation to single and multiple family dwellings.

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  8. Adolescent girls who spend time with peers above the median will be less likely to have contact with their mothers (73).Schlegel, Alice - Adolescence: an anthropological inquiry, 1991 - 2 Variables

    This book discusses the characteristics of adolescence cross-culturally and examines the differences in the adolescent experience for males and females. Several relationships are tested in order to gain an understanding of cross-cultural patterns in adolescence.

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  9. "Societies with beliefs in aggressive supernaturals . . . had fewer nurturant agents, protected the infant less from environmental discomforts, showed him less affection, were more inconsistent in caring for his needs, and took less care of his needs" (168)Lambert, William W. - Some correlates of beliefs in the malevolence and benevolence of supernatura..., 1959 - 5 Variables

    This article tests hypotheses about the relationship between how the general anticipations of pain in develop in children and the formal belief systems of a society. The authors posit that beliefs in malevolent supernatural beings reflect punitive child rearing practices and beliefs in benevolent supernatural being relfect nurturing child rearing practices. Results generally support this hypothesis.

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  10. In infancy principal caretakers (other than the mother) are most likely to be female children or female adults (170).Weisner, Thomas S. - My brother's keeper: child and sibling caretaking [and comments and reply], 1977 - 1 Variables

    This study discusses childcare done by children. While no empirical hypotheses are tested, the authors identify some potential sociocultural and developmental correlates of childcare by children and provide relevant descriptive statistics. Possible correlates include mother-child relationships, conceptions and emergence of childhood stages, organization of play groups, development of social responsibility, sex differences, personality development, cognitive style and cognitive development, motivation and learning.

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