Found 1547 Hypotheses across 155 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. As groups increase in size and hierarchical complexity, individuals in power will use their asymmetrical advantage to collect perquisites as third parties and a proportionate amount of polygynous relationships (210).Betzig, Laura L. - Despotism and differential reproduction: a cross-cultural correlation of con..., 1982 - 4 Variables

    This article uses a Darwinian approach, predicting that hierarchies persist and increase in social evolution because they increase fitness for individuals at higher levels within the hierarchy who choose to further social assymetry and benefit their fitness at the expense of the greater group. Polygyny is used as the indicator of fitness. Correlations tested support the hypothesis.

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  2. Strength in cross-cutting ties in decentralized societies, intercommunity marriage in decentralized societies, matrilocality, fraternal interest group strength, polygyny, socioeconomic complexity, political power concentration, harsh socialization practices, affectionate socialization practices, and male gender identity conflict will be positively associated with external conflict and violence (552)Ross, Marc Howard - Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a n..., 1985 - 11 Variables

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  3. The scale of human groups (particularly community size) is associated with hierarchical complexity (49)Feinman, Gary M. - Size, complexity, and organizational variation: a comparative approach, 2010 - 2 Variables

    This article proposes that integrative differences mediate the relationship between demographic size and political complexity. Hypotheses are supported by a review of previous literature.

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  4. Strength of cross-cutting ties scale, intercommunity marriage in decentralized societies, matrilocality, intercommunity trade, fraternal interest group strength in decentralized societies, polygyny, socioeconomic complexity, political power concentration, harsh socialization practices, affectionate socialization practices, and male gender identity conflict will be positively associated with internal conflict and violence (552)Ross, Marc Howard - Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a n..., 1985 - 12 Variables

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  5. External conflict and violence, strength of cross-cutting ties scale, intercommunity marriage in decentralized societies, matrilocality, intercommunity trade, fraternal interest group strength in decentralized societies, polygyny, socioeconomic complexity, political power concentration, harsh socialization practices, affectionate socialization practices, and male gender identity conflict will be positively associated with internal conflict and violence (554)Ross, Marc Howard - Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a n..., 1985 - 13 Variables

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  6. Internal conflict and violence, strength in cross-cutting ties in decentralized societies, intercommunity marriage in decentralized societies, matrilocality, fraternal interest group strength, polygyny, socioeconomic complexity, political power concentration, harsh socialization practices, affectionate socialization practices, and male gender identity conflict will be positively associated with external conflict and violence (554)Ross, Marc Howard - Internal and external conflict and violence: cross-cultural evidence and a n..., 1985 - 12 Variables

    This article suggests a general theory of conflict and violence that may help explain the conditions under which internal conflict co-occur or are differentiated.

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  7. Adultery is positively associated with conjugal dissolution (658).Betzig, Laura L. - Causes of conjugal dissolution: a cross-cultural study, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on predictors of divorce, cross-culturally. Variables measuring infidelity, infertility, personality, economy, kin, absence, health, ritual and politics are tested. An evolutionary/adaptionist approach is found to be most useful in explaining the nature of conjugal dissolution cross-culturally.

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  8. Sterility, or childlessness between the couple, is positively associated with conjugal dissolutation (662).Betzig, Laura L. - Causes of conjugal dissolution: a cross-cultural study, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on predictors of divorce, cross-culturally. Variables measuring infidelity, infertility, personality, economy, kin, absence, health, ritual and politics are tested. An evolutionary/adaptionist approach is found to be most useful in explaining the nature of conjugal dissolution cross-culturally.

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  9. Economics, most notably inadequate support, is positively associated with conjugal dissolution (664)Betzig, Laura L. - Causes of conjugal dissolution: a cross-cultural study, 1989 - 2 Variables

    This study focuses on predictors of divorce, cross-culturally. Variables measuring infidelity, infertility, personality, economy, kin, absence, health, ritual and politics are tested. An evolutionary/adaptionist approach is found to be most useful in explaining the nature of conjugal dissolution cross-culturally.

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  10. There will be a relationship between the traditional presence of a segmentary lineage system and the presence and intensity of conflictMoscona, Jacob - Social structure and conflict: Evidence from sub-Saharan Africa, 2017 - 8 Variables

    Using a sample of 145 African societies, the authors seek to examine the relationship between segmentary lineage organization and conflict. Presented is evidence supporting the claim that segmentary lineage societies are more prone to conflict and to conflicts larger in scale and duration. The authors aim to contribute to a better understanding of the determinants of conflict, and additionally address the applicability of the present study beyond Africa.

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