Found 25 Hypotheses across 3 Pages (0.001 seconds)
  1. Presence of plow animals will be negatively associated with polygyny (p. 705).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

    Related HypothesesCite
  2. Intensity of agriculture will be negatively associated with marital structure (p. 706).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

    Related HypothesesCite
  3. Female contribution to subsistence will be positively associated with polygyny (p. 702).Lee, Gary R. - Marital structure and economic systems, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article tests a broad hypothesis that marital structure is associated with economic type. Results indicate that where women's potential contribution to subsistence is high (as in gathering and agricultural societies), women's contribution is positively associated with polygyny. By contrast, in fishing, hunting, and herding societies, female contribution to subsistence is generally minimal and has a negative association with polygyny.

    Related HypothesesCite
  4. Autonomy in mate selection will be negatively associated with the prevalence of extended families (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

    Related HypothesesCite
  5. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with the prevalence of extended families (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

    Related HypothesesCite
  6. Autonomy in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

    Related HypothesesCite
  7. Romantic love as a criterion in mate selection will be negatively associated with non-neolocal postmarital residence customs (323).Lee, Gary R. - Mate-selection systems and criteria: variation according to family structure, 1980 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the relationships between family structure, type of mate-selection system, and romantic love as a basis for mate-selection. Analysis indicates that autonomous mate selection is more common in societies with nuclear family structure and neolocal residence patterns. Romantic love as a basis for mate selection is also more common with nuclear family organization, but it is negatively associated with neolocal residence patterns.

    Related HypothesesCite
  8. Wives’ power will be positively associated with wives’ proportionate contribution to subsistence (28, 31-2).Lee, Gary R. - Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal cultures, 1983 - 2 Variables

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

    Related HypothesesCite
  9. Wives’ power and wives’ proportionate contribution to subsistence will be negatively associated with cultural complexity (31-2).Lee, Gary R. - Conjugal power and spousal resources in patriarchal cultures, 1983 - 3 Variables

    This article reviews theories of marital power and tests for a relationship between wives’ contribution to subsistence and their conjugal power in patriarchal cultures. Results indicate a positive association. The role of cultural complexity is also considered; its relationship with wives’ power is negative and linear while its relationship with wives’ contribution to subsistence is negative and non-linear.

    Related HypothesesCite
  10. The status of the elderly will be positively associated with familial structural complexity (432).Lee, Gary R. - Family structure and the status of the elderly: a preliminary empirical study, 1979 - 2 Variables

    This article examines the status of the elderly cross-culturally, proposing that familial complexity, unlineal descent, and unilocal residence are predictors of high status. The authors theorize that elderly male status will be highest in patrilineal and patrilocal societies; elderly female status will be highest in matrilineal and matrilocal societies. Some support is found for these patterns, but the authors ultimately regard them as too simple to adequately predict status of the elderly.

    Related HypothesesCite