Found 1996 Hypotheses across 200 Pages (0.007 seconds)
  1. Paternal care is inversely associated with environmental risks (p. 121).Quinlan, Robert J. - Human parental effort and environmental risk, 2007 - 4 Variables

    This article tests the effect of environmental risk on parental investment, differentiating between maternal and paternal care. Results indicate that the saturation point of parental investment may be a function of environmental risk, as parental care experiences diminishing returns due to extrinsic risks.

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  2. "As pathogen severity increases, so should permanenent marking of body areas that are attended to for evaluating attractiveness and mate quality" (403).Singh, Devendra - Sex differences in the anatomical locations of human body scarification and ..., 1997 - 6 Variables

    This study examines the relationship between body scarification and pathogen prevalence. Authors hypothesize that risk of serious pathogens will be related to scarification on areas of the body that are associated with physical attractiveness and fertility. Results show that only female stomach scarification is significantly related to pathogen prevalence.

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  3. Pathogen stress will independently predict authoritarian governance when controlling for malnutrition, famine, and warfare in the cross-cultural sample (5).Murray, Damian R. - Pathogens and politics: further evidence that parasite prevalence predicts a..., 2013 - 5 Variables

    This article employs cross-national and cross-cultural methods to investigate whether pathogen stress is a direct determinant of authoritarianism. The study controls on other factors such as famine, warfare, and malnutrition and evaluates alternative causal models.

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  4. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with the importance of witchcraft (p. 170).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 4 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  5. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with the prevalence of theft (p. 171).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 3 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  6. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with acceptance of extramarital sex (p. 169).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 4 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  7. Parental involvement will be negatively correlated with the prevalence of aggression (homicide and assault) (p. 171).Quinlan, Robert J. - Parenting and cultures of risk: a comparative analysis of infidelity, aggres..., 2007 - 3 Variables

    This study tests a broad "risk response" hypothesis: environmental risk can reduce parents' involvement and care which, through its effects on children's behavioral strategies later in life, ultimately produces a larger cultural model favoring risky behavior. Examinations of extramarital sex, aggression, theft, and witchcraft support this hypothesis, leading the authors to suggest that child development is the underpinning of cultural adaptation in the face of environmental change.

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  8. Early mortality risk will have a larger impact on adolescent fertility rates than current mortality risk. (4004)Placek, Caitlyn D. - Adolescent fertility and risky environments: a population-level perspective ..., 2012 - 3 Variables

    This study provides the first tests of the relationships between population-level adolescent fertility rates and mortality risk at two different time points. The hypotheses are based in life-history theory, which predicts that human reproductive choices are shaped by mortality. The authors find that reproductive strategies are significantly predicted by both early (between ages 1-7) risks of mortality and current cues of mortality risk.

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  9. Current mortality risk will mediate the relationship between early mortality risk and adolescent fertility rates. (4004)Placek, Caitlyn D. - Adolescent fertility and risky environments: a population-level perspective ..., 2012 - 3 Variables

    This study provides the first tests of the relationships between population-level adolescent fertility rates and mortality risk at two different time points. The hypotheses are based in life-history theory, which predicts that human reproductive choices are shaped by mortality. The authors find that reproductive strategies are significantly predicted by both early (between ages 1-7) risks of mortality and current cues of mortality risk.

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  10. Different levels of early mortality risk will influence the relationship between current risk of death and reproductive outcomes. (4004)Placek, Caitlyn D. - Adolescent fertility and risky environments: a population-level perspective ..., 2012 - 3 Variables

    This study provides the first tests of the relationships between population-level adolescent fertility rates and mortality risk at two different time points. The hypotheses are based in life-history theory, which predicts that human reproductive choices are shaped by mortality. The authors find that reproductive strategies are significantly predicted by both early (between ages 1-7) risks of mortality and current cues of mortality risk.

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