Found 2433 Hypotheses across 244 Pages (0.047 seconds)
  1. Certain characteristics of societies will be significantly correlated in the same direction in both of Murdock's data sets.Rudmin, Floyd Webster - Cross-Cultural Correlates of the Ownership of Private Property: Two Samples ..., 1995 - 55 Variables

    The present study aims to evaluate correlations of private property from two of Murdock's datasets, one of 147 societies (1981) and the other of 312 societies (1967). Altogether the author tested 146 variables coded by Murdock against variables regarding the ownership of land and of movables drawn from Murdock (1967), Simmons (1937), and Swanson (1960). In total, there were 51 statistically significant correlations between private property ownership and other variables. Additionally, the author summarizes the results from this article and the two that preceded it stating that throughout all of the correlations he ran, the practice of agriculture, the use of cereal grains, and the presence of castes and classes were the only variables that predicted private property in all of the datasets that were utilized.

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  2. "A long postpartum taboo will be more frequent . . . in societies subsisting mainly on extensive agriculture and horticulture . . . in contrast to societies subsisting mainly on gathering, hunting, fishing, animal husbandry . . . intensive or modern agriculture" (243)Saucier, Jean-Francois - Correlates of the long post-partum taboo: a cross-cultural study, 1972 - 2 Variables

    This study investigates correlates of the post-partum sex taboo. Empirical analysis identifies several predictors, from extensive agriculture to localized kin groups. The authors suggest that the taboo imposes a burden on women and unmarried or monogamous young men, and it is best maintained in a community in which elders are in firm control and married women are considered outsiders due to village exogamy.

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  3. When controlling for pathogen stress and male mortality in war, the absence of the plow will be positively associated with nonsororal polygynyEmber, Melvin - Comparing explanations of polygyny, 2007 - 2 Variables

    This article uses logistic regression analysis to examine pathogen stress and male mortality in warfare as predictors of nonsororal polygyny. Differences between state and non-state societies are observed. The authors also retest variables from White and Burton's 1988 study on causes of polygyny, finding only fraternal interest groups and absence of plow significant.

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  4. Double descent societies with avunculocality will have polygyny significantly more than double descent societies that are patrilocal (254).Ember, Melvin - The conditions that may favor avunculocal residence, 1983 - 2 Variables

    This paper offers a tentative theory of avunculocal residence: societies that were matrilocal and matrilineal will be likely to develop avunculocality when they switch to internal warfare and experience a high male mortality rate. Some cross-cultural evidence to support this theory is provided.

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  5. In societies with simple agricultural food production, polygyny will be prevalent (243, 56).Textor, Robert B. - A Cross-Cultural Summary: Polygyny, 1967 - 2 Variables

    Textor summarizes cross-cultural findings on polygyny pertaining to cultural, environmental, psychological, and social phenomena.

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  6. There is variability in residence patterns for hunter-gatherer and horticulturalist societies.Walker, Robert S. - Human Residence Patterns, 2015 - 2 Variables

    The present research examines the residence patterns of 34 hunter-gatherer societies and 34 lowland South American horticulturalist societies using census data. Contrary to the traditional view of patrilocal postmarital residence being prevalent, the present findings suggest more multilocality in residence patterns for hunter-gatherer and horticulturalist societies. The author concludes that hunter-gatherers are slightly patrilocal and horticulturalists slightly matrilocal.

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  7. Variation in paternal care within a species will be correlated with variation in socioecological conditions (157).Katz, Mary Maxwell - The role of the father: an anthropological perspective, 1981 - 4 Variables

    This chapter examines the relationship between male parental behavior and influences of species, ecological and social factors. The authors first present a cross-phylogenetic perspective on paternal differences between species, then offer two quantitative studies: a comparative study of non-western human societies that correlates father-infant proximity with socioecological factors and another about father-infant proximity among the !Kung.

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  8. Mode of marriage is more significantly and more strongly correlated with mode of subsistence than it is with post-marital residence (166)Evascu, Thomas L. - A holocultural study of societal organization and modes of marriage: a gene..., 1975 - 3 Variables

    The author examines modes of marriage and societal organization from a functionalist (general evolutionary) perspective. He focuses on the relationships of subsistence (economic) patterns, settlement patterns, and social complexity to predicting modes of marriage, with particular emphasis on the importance of subsistence as an underlying structural influence upon social patterns.

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  9. Hunter-gatherer and lowland South American horticulturalist societies tend toward multilocality.Walker, Robert S. - Human Residence Patterns, 2015 - 2 Variables

    The present research examines the residence patterns of 34 hunter-gatherer societies and 34 lowland South American horticulturalist societies using census data. Contrary to the traditional view of patrilocal postmarital residence being prevalent, the present findings suggest more multilocality in residence patterns for hunter-gatherer and horticulturalist societies. The author concludes that hunter-gatherers are slightly patrilocal and horticulturalists slightly matrilocal.

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  10. "[Mode of marriage is related to subsistence]: brideservice is related to hunting and gathering . . . bridewealth relates to horticulture, extensive agriculture and pastoralism . . . and dowry is related to intensive agriculture and industrialism" (177-188)Evascu, Thomas L. - A holocultural study of societal organization and modes of marriage: a gene..., 1975 - 2 Variables

    The author examines modes of marriage and societal organization from a functionalist (general evolutionary) perspective. He focuses on the relationships of subsistence (economic) patterns, settlement patterns, and social complexity to predicting modes of marriage, with particular emphasis on the importance of subsistence as an underlying structural influence upon social patterns.

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