Found 2246 Hypotheses across 225 Pages (0.008 seconds)
  1. "Bolhon type organizations tend to involve unbalanced leiturgical systems relative to palihog types, which are relatively more likely to involve balanced compensatory systems" (103)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  2. "Voluntary organizations and organizations with basic or auxiliary contractual elements tend to possess balanced compensatory reward systems" (102)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  3. "Familial autonomous organizations tend to be characterized by unbalanced compensatory reward systems" (104)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  4. "Rewards based on achievement tend to consist of money; rewards based on other criteria tend to consist of produce and goods in kind" (109)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  5. "Familial/reciprocal organizations and custodial corvees tend to be characterized by unbalanced leiturgical reward systems" (103)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  6. "In balanced reward systems goods in kind are more likely to be distributed in tillage and construction; produce, in hunting, fishing, and collection" (100)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  7. "Bureaucracies tend to possess balanced reward systems; associations, unbalanced reward systems" (102)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  8. "Tillage, hunting, construction and manufacturing tend to have balanced compensatory or unbalanced leiturgical reward systems; fishing, collection and animal husbandry tend to have unbalanced compensatory or balanced leiturgical reward systems"fUdy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  9. "Serfdom, tenancy, and peonage tend toward balanced leiturgical reward systems" (104)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - Organization of work: a comparative analysis of production among nonindustr..., 1959 - 2 Variables

    This book is a comparative study of the ways in which work is organized among non-industrial societies in the production of material goods. Two general hypotheses guide the author's work: (1) The structure of any work organization is influenced by both techonological processes and social setting, and (2) The structure of any reward system is influenced by the characteristics of the work organization, the social setting, and the limits imposed by features of the technological processes. Several predictions are presented and all are supported.

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  10. "In formal organizations mutual positive associations exist between bureaucratic elements" (793)Udy, Stanley H., Jr. - 'Bureaucracy' and 'rationality' in Weber's organization theory, 1959 - 3 Variables

    "Seven of Max Weber's ideal-typical specifications for 'rational bureaucracy' are reformulated as a system of three 'bureaucratic' and four 'rational' variables. It is proposed that (a) bureaucratic variables are positively associated; (b) rational variables are positively associated; but that (c) rational variables are negatively associated with bureaucratic variables." Hypotheses are supported.

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